December 11, 2008

What Time of Year Is It? (Year 4 Follow-up, Part 2)

Filed under: Economy,MSM Biz/Other Bias — Tom @ 11:15 am

With all of the hubbub over other events, I’m not going to do a full-blown post on this, but I will get the related search results, so I can do a finale a couple of days before Christmas.

Here goes (all from Google News as of about 11:00 a.m.):

In addition to the usual conclusion about percentage of mention (twice as often for “Christmas layoffs” vs. “Christmas shopping season”), the struggling economy has given rise to a situation where, in raw numbers, media outlets actually are mentioning Christmas over twice as often (6216 divided by 2632 is 2.36) in connection with layoffs as they are in connection with shopping.

But there’s no war on Christmas (/sarc).

__________________________________________

Previous Posts:
- Nov. 25, 2008 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 4 Follow-up, Part 1)
- Dec. 22, 2007 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 3 Follow-up, Part 3)
- Dec. 10, 2007 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 3 Follow-up, Part 2)
- Nov. 28, 2007 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 3 Follow-up, Part 1)
- Dec. 22, 2006 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 2 Follow-up, Part 3)
- Dec. 9, 2006 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 2 Follow-up, Part 2)
- Nov. 26, 2006 — What Time of Year Is It? (Year 2 Follow-up, Part 1)
- Nov. 11, 2006 — Will Christmas Be a Four-Letter Word This Year?
- Dec. 22, 2005 — When You Can Say What at This Time of Year (UPDATE 2)
- Dec. 7, 2005 — When You Can Say What at This Time of Year (UPDATE)
- Nov. 29, 2005 — What Time of Year Is It?
- Nov. 23, 2005 — When You Can Say What at This Time of Year

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13 Comments

  1. Oh yes, God forbid we be inclusive of non-Christians. Perhaps they should have separate water fountains as well?

    Comment by David — December 11, 2008 @ 3:22 pm

  2. #1, Oh you’re a hoot. The trend is towards EXCLUDING Christians, and you know it.

    Comment by TBlumer — December 11, 2008 @ 3:30 pm

  3. So Christmas isn’t a holiday?!? Seriously Blumer, if there’s really a war on Christmas you’re going to have to pick a side and stick with it.

    Comment by David — December 11, 2008 @ 3:55 pm

  4. Oh come on now Blumer, I was looking forward to hearing you explain that one.

    Comment by David — December 11, 2008 @ 7:39 pm

  5. #4, not a lot to explain. It’s the Christmas shopping season. There are other holidays, but the overwhelming percentage of gift-giving is done on Christmas and Christmas Eve, and the overwhelmingly dominant reason people are shopping for gifts is Christmas. So the only rational reason to minimize the use of “Christmas” at an ever-increasing rate and now near-90% rate is to minimize its significance — except perhaps to associate it with something bad, like layoffs.

    Duh. I really had to “explain” that?

    Comment by TBlumer — December 11, 2008 @ 10:15 pm

  6. Not so fast Blumer, you were supposed to explain why “happy holidays” doesn’t include Christmas.

    Lets put this another way. Let’s say you walk into a room filled with 99 men and 1 woman. Would it be proper to ignore the woman and say it’s a group of men, or to say it’s a group of people?

    Face it Blumer, this isn’t a secular war on Christmas. This is nothing more that a Christian war on non-Christians.

    Comment by David — December 12, 2008 @ 10:29 am

  7. Not so fast Blumer, you were supposed to explain why “happy holidays” doesn’t include Christmas.

    EXACTLY WHERE was I asked to do this?

    I don’t know how to respond to non-arguments such as yours …. so I won’t.

    Merry Christmas.

    Comment by TBlumer — December 12, 2008 @ 11:02 am

  8. Hey, you’re the one that said this happy holidays trend was excluding Christians.Furthermore, you acted like the reasoning behind that claim was obvious.

    It seems to me that if it was so obvious, you shouldn’t have much trouble explaining it to me.

    Seasons Greetings,

    David

    Comment by David — December 12, 2008 @ 11:51 am

  9. D**n, you are very reading-challenged and comprehension-challenged.

    The post was about how the press describes shopping and layoffs during the Christmas season, and how the trends therein contribute to the credibility of a belief that there is indeed a war on Christmas.

    I never discussed “this happy holidays trend. Not once.

    The post, and the series, have nothing to do with how people greet each other.

    You don’t have an argument, so you constantly change the subject.

    Merry Christmas.

    Comment by TBlumer — December 12, 2008 @ 11:59 am

  10. Ok, so I got a little off topic. What can I say, this whole “war on Christmas” BS gets on my nerves.

    Did you ever think to try your Google searches to see how often Christmas comes up in searches related to hiring? Holiday hiring still leads (but then holiday is the all inclusive term), but it’s more of a 60%-40% split. But that must not be relevant.

    Comment by David — December 12, 2008 @ 1:04 pm

  11. ["holiday season" hiring] — 1,302 results (92%)

    ["Christmas season" hiring] — 114 results (8%)

    The Christmas season is one-third or less likely to be mentioned with “hiring” as Christmas is likely to be associated with “layoffs.”

    QED

    Thank you for your support.

    Comment by TBlumer — December 12, 2008 @ 1:24 pm

  12. Did you search for “Christmas season” layoffs? Try again there Blumer, we could both manipulate our search terms to show we’re right here.

    http://news.google.com/news?sourceid=mozilla-search&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&tab=wn&hl=en&nolr=1&q=christmas+hiring&btnG=Search

    http://news.google.com/news?sourceid=mozilla-search&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&tab=wn&hl=en&nolr=1&q=holiday+hiring&btnG=Search

    Comment by David — December 12, 2008 @ 2:05 pm

  13. Your searches are actually on christmas hiring (2038) and holiday hiring (3052). I’ll throw in holidays hiring (plural – 1103).

    This puts us into about the same place as layoffs. About 25% relate to Christmas, 75% to holiday(s). That’s funny, because everyone I know without exception who goes to the stores says they’re doing “Christmas shopping.” So people getting hired for the season must be getting hired because of ….. Christmas.

    The problem is that there are no prior-year metrics to compare.

    Comment by TBlumer — December 12, 2008 @ 4:34 pm

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