July 28, 2009

Mitch Albom: WH Using Class Warfare To Sell Healthcare

Filed under: Activism,Health Care,Scams,Taxes & Government — Rose @ 2:44 pm

Well, duh…

But when liberal-minded, mainstream media columnists are clearly seeing Health Care Deform for what it is, it’s time to turn out the lights.

From Mitch Albom at Freep.com:

In explaining why it was OK to sock a new 5.4% tax on the highest earners in this country — to pay for health care reform — President Obama’s press secretary, Robert Gibbs, said this:

“The president believes that the richest 1% of this country has had a pretty good run of it for many, many, many years.”

Ah. So that’s it. The old “You’ve had it good enough for long enough” policy. That’s why a family earning a million dollars a year should now cough up $54,000 of that — in addition to all the other taxes it pays — to cover health care for people who may not pay a penny of new tax themselves.

Because, after all, those rich folks have had a pretty good run of it.

…But to justify a grossly overweighted tax by saying “You people have had it good long enough” is to engage in the worst and most destructive form of politics: class warfare.

By making a snarky comment like that, Gibbs suggests that the top 1% are a bunch of Bernie Madoffs, that they’ve been scheming their way to riches, evading the system, hiding their money in complicated offshore deals. You know — wink, wink — they’ve had it “pretty good.”

This is every bit as insulting as saying all poor people are lazy welfare cheats. Imagine the uproar if he’d said that. What’s the difference?

…For a moment, let’s take Gibbs and Obama at their words. “A pretty good run of it for many, many, many years.” OK. In what way? Did those people earn their money? Yes. Did they work for it? Yes. So in that regard they are no different than a schoolteacher or postal worker. They worked, they got paid.

Presumably, then — unless he’s suggesting they’re all crooks — when Gibbs says “a pretty good run of it” he means in taxes. Hmm. Let’s see. Those high income earners currently shell out around 35% in income taxes, the highest rate, plus state income taxes, local income taxes, property and other taxes that likely chew up between 45% and 50% of their money. If Obama’s tax-related plans all go through, it could, for some, approach 60%.

…On the other hand, would you tell people who pay no taxes that they’ve had a pretty good run? Would you say it to people who never really look for work, who don’t bother in school, who look for ways to live off the state?

Yet all such people, under Obama’s plan, will get health care — paid for by those lousy, conniving rich people. And please, let’s not imagine that all poor people are noble single mothers with two jobs, three kids, good credit and an ailing mother. Unless you’re naive enough to believe that all wealthy Americans are greedy pigs.

Looks like Mitch has been spending “Tuesdays with the Taxman.”

Fred and Jeri Thompson Interview Betsy McCaughey

Betsy McCaughey:

Fred & Jeri interview Besty McCaughey, former Lt. Governor of New York and Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow.

This is 8 minutes of the most informative assessment on the nooks & crannies of “healthcare deform” that I have heard to date.

Boomers and seniors should pay special, close attention and then decide whether or not you really want to join or renew with AARP. They support this boondoggle that literally kicks you to the curb to die.

Please, listen to it again and then forward to others who are not as enlightened. You can also go to Betsy’s website to find out more.

High-Maintenance Much?

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Rose @ 9:38 am

It doesn’t take 5 minutes to know that Michelle Obama is a condescending Prima Donna. In fact I have no doubt that SHE was in Air Force One (probably with Oprah) getting a pedicure and laughing it up when it dive-bombed New York.

It turns out however, that she is also a one-woman stimulus package to the tune of about $1.2 million and some change.

From Canada Free Press:

No, Michele Obama does not get paid to serve as the First Lady and she doesn’t perform any official duties. But this hasn’t deterred her from hiring an unprecedented number of staffers to cater to her every whim and to satisfy her every request in the midst of the Great Recession. Just think Mary Lincoln was taken to task for purchasing china for the White House during the Civil War. And Mamie Eisenhower had to shell out the salary for her personal secretary.

Here is what we are paying for:

$172,200 – Sher, Susan (CHIEF OF STAFF; “$172,2000″ at link, corrected)
$140,000 – Frye, Jocelyn C. (DEPUTY ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTOR OF POLICY AND PROJECTS FOR THE FIRST LADY)
$113,000 – Rogers, Desiree G. (SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT AND WHITE HOUSE SOCIAL SECRETARY)
$102,000 – Johnston, Camille Y. (SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE FIRST LADY)
Winter, Melissa E. (SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT AND DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE FIRST LADY)
$90,000 – Medina, David S. (DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE FIRST LADY)
$84,000 – Lelyveld, Catherine M. (DIRECTOR AND PRESS SECRETARY TO THE FIRST LADY)
$75,000 – Starkey, Frances M. (DIRECTOR OF SCHEDULING AND ADVANCE FOR THE FIRST LADY)
$70,000 – Sanders, Trooper (DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF POLICY AND PROJECTS FOR THE FIRST LADY)
$65,000 – Burnough, Erinn J. (DEPUTY DIRECTOR AND DEPUTY SOCIAL SECRETARY)
Reinstein, Joseph B. (DEPUTY DIRECTOR AND DEPUTY SOCIAL SECRETARY)
$62,000 – Goodman, Jennifer R. (DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF SCHEDULING AND EVENTS COORDINATOR FOR THE FIRST LADY)
$60,000 – Fitts, Alan O. (DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF ADVANCE AND TRIP DIRECTOR FOR THE FIRST LADY)
Lewis, Dana M. (SPECIAL ASSISTANT AND PERSONAL AIDE TO THE FIRST LADY)
$52,500 – Mustaphi, Semonti M. (ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND DEPUTY PRESS SECRETARY TO THE FIRST LADY)
$50,000 – Jarvis, Kristen E. (SPECIAL ASSISTANT FOR SCHEDULING AND TRAVELING AIDE TO THE FIRST LADY)
$45,000 – Lechtenberg, Tyler A. (ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF CORRESPONDENCE FOR THE FIRST LADY)
Tubman, Samantha (DEPUTY ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR,SOCIAL OFFICE)
$40,000 – Boswell, Joseph J. (EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE FIRST LADY)
$36,000 – Armbruster, Sally M. (STAFF ASSISTANT TO THE SOCIAL SECRETARY)
Bookey, Natalie (STAFF ASSISTANT)
Jackson, Deilia A. (DEPUTY ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF CORRESPONDENCE FOR THE FIRST LADY)

What, no wardrobe coordinator? OK I’ll step up…

Ahem…hey babe! LAY OFF THE FLORAL!!!

Yes, I Know ….

Filed under: General — Tom @ 7:51 am

…. My WordPress theme and the program aren’t shaking hands right now. The sight looks plain, but is otherwise functioning. Hopefully the look will be restored shortly.

7:55 a.m. — Well, it’s back.

A National Health Care Story — From Japan

Filed under: Health Care,Life-Based News,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 7:49 am

This is from the country where respect for elders has been a defining aspect of its culture.

Sadly, it is one where there is sometimes a bit too much respect for authority. What follows is one of those times.

It came recently in an e-mail from what I consider to be a reliable source.

I don’t doubt it for a second:

Mr. Tanaka

I can never forget his face. He was looking up at me pleading for help.

I did my best, but Mr. Tanaka died, as healthy as he could be simply because he was too old and to Socialized Medicine no longer worth the investment.

I was born and raised in Japan and one of the special wonders of Japan is how well the young American’s inspired by the New Deal and the optimism following the end of the war designed the county.

Two of those wonders are Medical Insurance and the Pension system.

Both are mandatory and are one of the key reasons when much of the Asia is in such difficult straights, Japan sails on.

Mr. Tanaka was a dear friend.

He had served in World War II and although 75 – still young by Japanese standards – he travelled the world, first to see it and second to say “sorry” for all the things that he had seen during the War.

He had just come back from another trip to Southeast Asia and had contracted Malaria while volunteering at a disaster site.

I rushed to the hospital to see him and was informed solemnly by the family and attending doctor that he was dying.

“You don’t die from Malaria” was my first reaction and seeing his face, although unconscious seemingly pleading for help I began to move.

In answer to my question about why they weren’t treating him the doctor coldly responded “We don’t have any Malaria medicine.”

“Well of course you don’t – nobody gets Malaria in Japan these days – just check with one of the bigger hospitals and get some.”

“We tried but it will take too long” he responded.

Now I could tell something was very wrong. My dear friend had contracted Malaria and of course the tiny local hospital didn’t have anything for it, but the Doctor for some strange reason wasn’t enthusiastic to help.

Realizing that the hospital was just next to an American Military Base I immediately called and of course located a supply of Malaria Medicine which they cheerfully said they could bring over in ten minutes.

Relieved, I went back to the Doctor and let him know.

Instead of thanks I got a much colder “Stop messing with our business. Nobody asked you to do that.”

Now I was confused. I had located the medicine that would save my friends life and the doctor was mad.

I immediately went to his family and told them that he would be ok.

As we spoke, in stepped the doctor who coldly proclaimed “Are you going to believe him or me . . .”

I pleaded and pleaded but the confused family took the Doctors word that there was nothing that could be done and dear Mr. Tanaka, as healthy as could be, simply needing a Malaria shot died.

As the debate on Health Care became news, I suddenly remembered my experience with my dear friend and for the first time put two and two together.

Mr. Tanaka died because while the Japanese Medical Insurance System is good in providing universal medical coverage, it is not accountable and there is an unwritten rule to not provide special help to the elderly.

There is another even more dangerous aspect of the health insurance system – it produces docile, obedient “citizens”.

Finding their very lives in the hands of government, they become obedient, quiet and afraid.

Not only does it promote murder, it destroys freedom.

The current debate is not about providing health insurance to the uninsured – something must be done and can be done about that.

Rather, it is about trying to change the very culture of America. What is at stake is liberty itself.

And, just as clearly, life itself.

The doctor involved killed Mr. Tanaka by neglect as surely as if he had used a knife or gun.

This is where America’s so-called Party of Compassion would take us.

_____________________________________________

UPDATE: America should never forget the formative role Mitt Romney played in creating CommonwealthCare, aka state-run RomneyCare in Massachusetts, and how it has helped to move the entire nation perilously close to the just-described precipice.

Positivity: Officer’s recovery beat the odds

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:57 am

From Wichita, Kansas related videos are at link:

Posted on Sun, Jul. 12, 2009

A dispute had broken out over pizza, but that’s not what the man at the small white house in west Wichita was interested in discussing with Officer Derek Purcell. “Oh yeah, I saw a police shoot-out in the front yard,” he told Purcell. “I saw a police officer laying on the ground. I didn’t know he was shot, and I didn’t know who he was, but I saw it.”

Purcell turned to the officer working the call with him and said, “Did you hear this? This guy says a police officer was shot right here in front of his house, like six months ago. Can you believe that?”

Purcell wasn’t really surprised: He was the officer.

A routine stop to talk to a “suspicious character” became a desperate fight for life last July 11 after Purcell was shot twice. One of the bullets shredded the femoral artery in Purcell’s right leg, and he nearly bled to death.

The shooting comes up almost every time Purcell gets together with friends on the police force, and he has had many late-night talks with his mother, Monica, over the past several months.

“He’s always known how precious life is, but I think he appreciates it now more than ever,” Monica Purcell said. “He knows how blessed he is to still be alive.”

The road back

Derek Purcell defied tremendous odds simply by surviving that night. Doctors have told him that he was less than a minute from dying by the time he reached Via Christi Regional Medical Center-St. Francis Campus.

He has continued to exceed expectations during his recovery.

Before he was shot, he had begun lifting weights to bulk up and get into better shape.

When he graduated from the training academy late in 2005, he carried 160 pounds on his 5-foot-10-inch frame. He quickly learned a basic rule of the streets: Because he was so small, anytime someone felt like fighting with a crowd of police, they went after the smallest officer. That was usually him.

“I got tired of it,” he said.

On the day he was shot, he weighed 205 pounds and could bench-press 315 pounds. Doctors told him his conditioning was a key reason he survived.

Quitting law enforcement never seriously entered Purcell’s mind. Except for a brief stint in a Catholic seminary to see whether God was calling him to be a priest, all he has ever wanted to be is a cop.

Within a few months of the shooting, he was cleared to return to desk duty. By January, he was given approval to go back on patrol. ….

Go here for the rest of the story.