June 20, 2011

AP Headline Claims ‘GOP Wants Small’ Campaign Map; Story Has No Evidence

To be fair to the Associated Press’s Charles Babington, he may not have written the headline applied to his early analysis (“Obama wants big 2012 campaign map, GOP wants small”) of how the presidential electoral map looks. But what he wrote essentially fits the headline, but didn’t provide any evidence that the Republican Party is only focusing on winning back the states lost by John McCain in 2008 which George W. Bush won in 2004 to get past the 270 electoral votes needed to retake the presidency.

Here are several paragraphs from Babington’s coverage (numbered tags are mine):

Republicans hope voters’ fears about jobs and the economy will help them reclaim a handful of Mountain West and Southern states that were crucial to Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential win. [1]

Obama’s campaign appears just as determined to hold those states next year and force Republicans to spend precious resources defending places they’d like to consider safe.

Every four years, political operatives fixate on the dozen or so states that always decide close presidential elections.

This time, Obama hopes to play on as big an Electoral College map as possible, and his team insists it will compete for the first time in traditionally solid Republican states like Georgia and Arizona. Republicans, conversely, want a compact map, hoping for wins in big, always-contested states such as Florida and Ohio, which were key to George W. Bush’s victories in 2000 and 2004. [1]

… Obama insiders say he could have won Arizona in 2008 if John McCain, the state’s senior senator, had not been the GOP nominee. They argue that with Arizona’s Hispanic population still growing, Obama’s chances are better this time because that group leans toward Democrats.

Many Republicans scoff at such talk. But they have their own problems, starting with the task of taking back most or all of the nine swing-voting states that Obama won in 2008 and that Democrat John Kerry lost in 2004: Florida, North Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Iowa, Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico. [2]

Notes:

  • [1] –The two sentences with this tag, when considered together, would give one the impression that Ohio is a Mountain West or Southern State. Uh, not exactly.
  • [2] — Babington quoted no one who supported his contention that “Republicans … want a compact map.” He named the following states as candidates for a possible GOP reversal of fortune: Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Mexico, Nevada, Iowa, North Carolina, Virginia, Colorado, Michigan, Indiana, and Wisconsin. That’s 12 states. John McCain carried __ states. McCain was one electoral vote in Nebraska shy of taking 22 states. Put all of those states together, and all that remains are the three West Coast states, Minnesota (which shouldn’t be a lost cause, given a strongly Republican legislature and a tax-the-rich Democratic governor), and the Northeast (ceding New Hampshire to Democrats, which seems dubious). Geez Chuck, what in the world is “compact” or “small” about that?

I’ll indulge Babington’s relay of Team Obama’s claim to want to invade strongly red-state turf; after all, they did say it. But, as the economy continues to struggle and the administration’s heavyhanded behavior becomes ever more obvious, excuse me for doubting that they really believe it.

Cross-posted at NewsBusters.org.

AP Rips Obama For Not Acting on ‘Gun Safety’ (i.e., ‘Gun Control’), While Nearly Ignoring DOJ/ATF Scandal

ATFlogo0611In a late Monday morning report, the Associated Press’s Erica Werner wondered why “the White House has yet to take any new steps on gun violence” he supposedly promised in the wake of the January shooting of Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

Either Werner or the headline writers at AP are getting extraordinarily impatient, as seen in the headline which follows the jump:

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Klavan’s KO: Paul Ryan v. Barack Obama on Medicare

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 12:34 pm

Golden (a small portion of the content is PG-13):

Mini-Roundup: The Obama Admin’s, and the Left’s, War on the Economy and Job Growth

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 9:26 am

The president and his administration may say that they want to see a robust economic recovery and meaningful job growth, but their actions and those of his party speak far louder than words:

  • At the Associated Press“Minnesota shutdown threatens weddings, much more.” This is all because Governor Mark Dayton, accurately characterized by the AP’s Martiga Lohn (stop the presses) as “a tax-the-rich Democrat,” won’t go along with any budget that doesn’t include raising the state’s “income tax on top earners.”
  • At the Wall Street Journal“The Accountable Care Fiasco.” Money snippet: “… the 429-page rule is a classic of top-down micromanagement.” 429 flippin’ pages to implement just one aspect of a 2000-page bill. And it’s so bad that 93% of members surveyed by “The American Medical Group Association, a trade association of multispeciality practice groups and other integrated providers … said they won’t enroll.”
  • The incomparable Michael Barone at the Washington Examiner (HT Instapundit) — “Gangster government attack on oil companies.” Key point (grafted together from separate sentences): “the Democrats’ proposal to take away ‘tax subsidies from big oil companies … (would) deny five major oil companies the domestic production tax credit that is available to all manufacturers and mining companies, including oil companies. The justification? Well, big oil companies get lousy ratings in polls. So stick ‘em with a higher tax bill. Sounds a lot like gangster government to me.” In other words, they’re not subsidies; they’re legitimate deductions for business expenses. Denying them doesn’t just sound like Gangster government (the term coined by Barone in May 2009); it is Gangster government.
  • J.E. Dyer at Hot Air“The EPA assault on Texas.” Money quote: “The EPA isn’t really making the argument that Texas is an environmental pigsty. It’s not putting any data or findings behind that premise, at any rate. Instead, it is simply acting high-handedly, assuming an authority that nothing in written law confers on it, to pronounce Texas’s procedures in violation of EPA rules – even when there is no basis for making that claim. To put it bluntly, the EPA is making a power grab.”
  • At the Daily Caller on Friday — “Daley can’t defend Obama’s ‘indefensible’ economic policies.” Beyond that: “As a former Boeing board member before taking on his White House job, Daley voted in favor of opening the new South Carolina plant (the National Labor Relations Board has thus far prevented from opening). Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham has challenged Daley to come out and defend his vote in the face of the NLRB’s case, but he hasn’t yet done so.” That’s because Bill Daley, who was a Boeing cheerleader in the years after the company moved its world headquarters to Chicago, has, in joining the Obama administration, become another corrupt, crony capitalism/Big Labor sellout.

Positivity: Rome’s rollerblading monk headed to France

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:56 am

From Rome — Read deep enough and you’ll the assumption that Europe has gone totally secular get busted:

Jun 16, 2011 / 11:41 am

Brother Anthony Ariniello is one of the most recognizable and intriguing figures to hit the streets of Rome in recent years. But the monk with a high-speed habit is about to leave the Eternal City.

“When I pass by, people often exclaim, ‘Wow, now that’s a modern monk!’” laughs the 32-year-old, originally from Boulder, Colorado.

Br. Ariniello uses his rollerblades as a practical way of getting to school and to pray at St. Peter’s Basilica. “They’re practical, economical and ecological,” he said of the skates that have earned him his Roman persona—“the rollerblading monk.”

His modern appearance aside, Br. Ariniello thinks there’s more to the surprised looks he gets when he tears through Rome’s streets.

“Perhaps they’ve never been face to face with a disciple of Christ before, let alone a religious. I myself once stereotyped the Church as outdated. Then I had my first personal encounter with a bishop and that was one-on-one for a game of racquetball! Then I began to really listen to the Church, and I found it full of life.”

That game of racquetball began a journey for Br. Ariniello that finds him on the verge of becoming a priest with one of the Church’s newest communities, The Community of the Beatitudes.

“It was in 1997 at World Youth Day in Paris that I first heard the Lord’s voice calling me to priesthood. That’s something I’d never considered before because of my desire to be married. But I then realized that the priesthood is another kind of marriage,” Br. Ariniello told CNA.

So a year later, Br. Ariniello left his philosophy studies at the University of Notre Dame to enter the new archdiocesan seminary in Denver, Colo. After four years of discernment, though, he said he felt God calling him in a slightly different direction.

“As a diocesan seminarian I was growing with the new intuitions of the Church. For example – the role of the family, the call of the poor, the rediscovery of the Jewish roots of our faith, as well as our relationship with eastern Orthodox churches.”

“So, for example, I learned that we can rediscover not only the Old Testament but the living Jewish people in their personal prayer. We can discover an icon not just as something beautiful but also how Orthodox people relate to an icon. These were the things I was discovering.”

And it was those insights which led him to join the Community of the Beatitudes in 2002.

Founded 29 years earlier in France, the community grew out of the Charismatic movement. It gathers together priests, nuns, married couples and single people into local groups that share a common prayer and community life.

“Even if members of the community have a job outside, the first thing in their life is the time of liturgical prayer, of personal silent prayer and a time of brotherly sharing or welcoming guests, or of going out on mission to proclaim the Gospel,” explained Br. Ariniello. … Jun 16, 2011 / 11:41 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Brother Anthony Ariniello is one of the most recognizable and intriguing figures to hit the streets of Rome in recent years. But the monk with a high-speed habit is about to leave the Eternal City.

“When I pass by, people often exclaim, ‘Wow, now that’s a modern monk!’” laughs the 32-year-old, originally from Boulder, Colorado.

Br. Ariniello uses his rollerblades as a practical way of getting to school and to pray at St. Peter’s Basilica. “They’re practical, economical and ecological,” he said of the skates that have earned him his Roman persona—“the rollerblading monk.”

His modern appearance aside, Br. Ariniello thinks there’s more to the surprised looks he gets when he tears through Rome’s streets.

“Perhaps they’ve never been face to face with a disciple of Christ before, let alone a religious. I myself once stereotyped the Church as outdated. Then I had my first personal encounter with a bishop and that was one-on-one for a game of racquetball! Then I began to really listen to the Church, and I found it full of life.”

That game of racquetball began a journey for Br. Ariniello that finds him on the verge of becoming a priest with one of the Church’s newest communities, The Community of the Beatitudes.

“It was in 1997 at World Youth Day in Paris that I first heard the Lord’s voice calling me to priesthood. That’s something I’d never considered before because of my desire to be married. But I then realized that the priesthood is another kind of marriage,” Br. Ariniello told CNA.

So a year later, Br. Ariniello left his philosophy studies at the University of Notre Dame to enter the new archdiocesan seminary in Denver, Colo. After four years of discernment, though, he said he felt God calling him in a slightly different direction.

“As a diocesan seminarian I was growing with the new intuitions of the Church. For example – the role of the family, the call of the poor, the rediscovery of the Jewish roots of our faith, as well as our relationship with eastern Orthodox churches.”

“So, for example, I learned that we can rediscover not only the Old Testament but the living Jewish people in their personal prayer. We can discover an icon not just as something beautiful but also how Orthodox people relate to an icon. These were the things I was discovering.”

And it was those insights which led him to join the Community of the Beatitudes in 2002.

Founded 29 years earlier in France, the community grew out of the Charismatic movement. It gathers together priests, nuns, married couples and single people into local groups that share a common prayer and community life.

“Even if members of the community have a job outside, the first thing in their life is the time of liturgical prayer, of personal silent prayer and a time of brotherly sharing or welcoming guests, or of going out on mission to proclaim the Gospel,” explained Br. Ariniello.

Go here for the rest of the story.