December 9, 2012

Another UK Health Care Horror Story Which U.S. Press Will Ignore

The UK’s National Health Service has been around since the late 1940s. Despite over 60 years of trying to get health care right, it still doesn’t come anywhere close. This long-term failure has done nothing to deter the Obama administration and Democrats from attempting to replicate the horror here in the U.S.

The latest example of scandlous neglect comes from a Labor MP, carried at the usually left-leaning UK Guardian and many other British outlets. Readers can count on it not being noticed by the U.S. press (HT Samizdat via Instapundit). The second-last paragraph in the excerpt following the jump seems to give away a feeling by the dead victim’s wife that she’s somehow betraying her statist brothers and sisters by speaking out:
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IBD on Friday’s Jobs Report: ‘Recession Mode’

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 10:53 am

In a Friday evening editorial (bolds are mine):

‘Bullish’ November Data Mask An Ugly Truth About Jobs

… look closer, and you see recession mode.

With nonfarm payrolls swelling by 146,000 and the jobless rate easing from 7.9% to 7.7%, November looked pretty good to many pundits. But the underlying trends aren’t so favorable, and the future, with a slowing economy about to drive off a fiscal cliff, isn’t bright at all.

Start with payroll jobs. The 146,000 wasn’t awful, but to make a serious dent in joblessness, we need to add at least 200,000 a month for a prolonged period. In this poisoned atmosphere for business, that won’t happen.

… OK, but we still have private-sector job growth, right? Not really. In the last six months, 621,000 of the 847,000 new jobs created have been in government, not the private sector, according to CNSNews.com. That’s 73% of all jobs — not a healthy labor market.

As for that big “drop” in the unemployment rate, all of it was due to the fact that 540,000 Americans are no longer looking for work. They either dropped out, took early disability or retired. Since the start of 2009, 9.7 million Americans have fallen into this category.

All told, more than 24 million Americans who want jobs don’t have them, driving the labor force participation rate to 63.6%, just above August’s 31-year low of 63.5%. This is the worst labor market in a recovery ever.

And it may get worse. The quarterly Wells Fargo/Gallup small-business survey found that 21% plan to cut jobs over the next six months — a surge from 10% last June and a record high.

… Why is the labor market refusing to recover as it has in the past, with millions of new jobs each year amid rapid economic growth? In a word, Obamanomics.

Thanks to ObamaCare, “stimulus” spending of $860 billion, threats of higher tax rates on small business owners and entrepreneurs, the economy’s going nowhere. We may soon enter a new small-business recession that can be blamed on no one but Barack Obama.

True enough, but Obama and his press apparatchiks will spend more time and energy trying to blame it all on someone else instead of doing the simple and obvious things needed to create a growing economy.

Sunday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (120912)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:05 am

Rules are here. Possible comment fodder may follow later. Other topics are also fair game.

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Positivity: Priest remembers Alfred Hitchcock’s faith

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 6:00 am

From New York City:

Dec 8, 2012 / 06:06 am

In a Dec. 6 article for the Wall Street Journal, Jesuit priest Father Mark Henninger recounted his time with famed director Alfred Hitchcock towards the end of his life.

In 1980, Fr. Henninger was invited by his friend Father Tom Sullivan to visit Hitchcock’s house in Bel Air, Calif. one afternoon to say Mass there.

Recalling his introduction to the director that day, Fr. Henninger said that “Hitchcock awoke, looked up and kissed (Father) Tom’s hand, thanking him.”

The priest noted that seeing scripts from Hitchcock’s films, such as “North by Northwest,” created a distraction for him as he said Mass in the study.

“Hitchcock had been away from the church for some time, and he answered the responses in Latin the old way,” Fr. Henninger remembered.

“But the most remarkable sight was that after receiving communion, he silently cried, tears rolling down his huge cheeks.”

Fr. Henninger continued to visit the Hitchcocks until Alfred’s death on April 29 of that year. He reflected on how remarkable it was that Hitchcock let himself be pursued by God at the end of his life.

Something “whispered in his heart,” he wrote, “and the visits answered a profound human desire, a real human need.”

Fr. Henninger’s story in the Wall Street Journal comes as a biopic on the director, “Hitchcock,” is in theaters after a limited release on Nov. 23. …

Go here for the rest of the story.