May 28, 2013

Good Questions; No Good Answers

Filed under: Economy,Immigration,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 9:45 am

The video (HT to longtime emailer):

The questions: Why is Congress giving 33 million new work permits to foreign job seekers? That’s like putting the entire population of Canada in line for American jobs.

The politicians call it “immigration reform.” What kind of “reform” brings in more job seekers when what 20 million Americans really need is more jobs?

The answers: There are no good ones.

Latest PJ Media Column (‘Producing Scandal Exhaustion’) Is Up

It’s here.

It will go up here at BizzyBlog on Thursday (link won’t work until then) after the blackout expires.

Tuesday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (052813)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:05 am

Rules are here. Possible comment fodder follows. Other topics are also fair game.

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Peter Ferrara at Forbes“To the Horror of Global Warming Alarmists, Global Cooling Is Here.” Also very good are two of Ferrera’s previous columns: “The Disgraceful Episode Of Lysenkoism Brings Us Global Warming Theory” (April 28) and “Sorry Global Warming Alarmists, The Earth Is Cooling” (May 31, 2012).

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Regarding Benghazi, never forget the following:

“These changes don’t resolve all of my issues or those of my building’s leadership.” With that sentence, one in a series of emails and draft “talking points” leaked to Jonathan Karl of ABC News, the Obama administration was caught playing politics with Benghazi.

Summaries of White House and State Department emails — some of which were first published by Stephen F. Hayes of the Weekly Standard – also contradict the White House version of events that led to U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice misleading the public about the cause of the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. installation in Libya.

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At USA Today (“The IRS Targeted My Organization”):

My name is Kevin Kookogey. I am president and founder of Linchpins of Liberty. Our motto is “to challenge the imagination of the rising generation.” So what does that mean?

Well, we mentor high school and college students in conservative political philosophy by engaging them with the great books and teaching them about America’s moral and constitutional order.

… In order to raise money, I filed an application with the IRS in January 2011, seeking to obtain 501(c)(3) status as an educational organization.

… I have been waiting for 27 months.

IRS has … (demanded) answers to an invasive, 95-point inquisition, including, for example, that I provide a list of my members and donors and that I state for the IRS my political position on virtually every issue of importance to me. Where does one begin? For good measure, I was asked to identify those whom I train and that I inform the federal government, in detail, about what I am teaching my students.

This is tyranny (“arbitrary or unrestrained exercise of power; despotic abuse of authority”).

Positivity: Dignity of man central to ‘rethinking solidarity,’ says Pope

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 6:00 am

From Vatican City:

May 25, 2013 / 10:15 am

Speaking to an international group dedicated to promoting education of the Church’s social teaching, Pope Francis called for a new economic view that places the human person at the center.

“We must return to the centrality of man, to a more ethical view of business and human relations, without the fear of losing something,” the Pope said on May 25.

Pope Francis addressed members of the Fondazione Centesimus Annus Pro Pontifice at the end of their three-day conference at the Vatican. Founded by Blessed Pope John Paul II in 1993, the organization is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

The Holy Father greeted the members of the international gathering and thanked them for their efforts to promote a greater understanding of the Church’s social doctrine.

He reflected on the theme of the conference, “Rethinking solidarity for employment: the challenges of the 21st century.”

The call to “rethink solidarity” is not a call to challenge Church teaching, but rather to apply it to the new circumstances and situations presented by the ever-changing socio-economic development of the modern world, the Pope said. …

Go here for the rest of the story.