June 2, 2013

Big Whoop: Politico’s Glueck Hypes One Republican Who (Sort of) Doesn’t Like Rick Perry’s ‘Jobs Raids’

RickPerryWidePolitico’s Katie Glueck must have been really desperate for something newsworthy as a Saturday column topic.

She apparently believed it was worth devoting over 1,500 words to a writeup whose key point was that “at least one Republican” doesn’t like Texas Governor Rick Perry’s aggressive attempts to persuade companies in other states to relocate to or expand in the Lone Star State. She cited only one. Even that person person’s criticism was very mild, and it came from someone who, because of his position, couldn’t say that what Perry is doing is great even if he wanted to without risking his job. Despite the overdose of verbiage, Glueck also never provided any details of Texas’s outsized contribution to the nation’s overall mediocre post-recession job growth.

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Not Yet News: Fla. Dem Congressman’s Chief of Staff Resigns After Admitting to Absentee Ballot Plot (BizzyBlog Update: Congressman Blames ‘Flawed’ Absentee Process, Says It Was ‘A Well-intentioned Attempt’

VoteFraudGraphicThis has to be an imaginary story, right? Most Democrats and others on the left continue to insist that voter fraud is not a problem, even in the face of examples like Minnesota U.S. Senator Al Franken, whose 312-vote “victory” margin in 2008 may have entirely consisted (and then some) of illegal votes by felons in just one county.

More recently, it seems that the claim is under revision. A Democratic Party county chair, in a Cincinnati Enquirer story about three out-of-staters who voted or attempted to vote in Ohio,  is reported to have “long said there is no evidence of systemic fraud.” Well, though they were were prevented from casting illegal ballots, a Florida Democratic congressman’s chief of staff and his alleged cohorts definitely attempted large-scale “systemic” fraud last year. The Miami Herald, which played an important investigative role, had the story on Friday. A Google News search on relevant terms indicates that it’s getting very little notice (15 items in total, most in Florida). Excerpts from Patricia Mazzei’s Herald story follow the jump (bolds are mine):

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N.J. Doc’s Occupy Wall Street Connections Ignored in AP Coverage of His Indictment

The indictment of Occupy Wall Street-connected Doctor Roberto Rivera on a number of charges, including “stashing large amounts of bomb-making materials at his home,” apparently wasn’t news anywhere until Friday afternoon at NorthJersey.com. The Associated Press’s unbylined five-paragraph report (HT Legal Insurrection) appeared Saturday aftenoon.

Kibret Markos’s Friday report noted the doctor’s Occupy Wall Street sympathies (“Rivera also was quoted in a Bloomberg News report last year voicing his support for Occupy Wall Street protesters”). The AP, whose union was among OWS’s most ardent supporters, did not. Instead, it “cleverly” misdirected by telling readers that “Prosecutors haven’t said why Rivera had the items or what he planned to do with them.” Evidence of those sympathies and of that involvement follow the jump.

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Sunday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (060213)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:05 am

Rules are here. Possible comment fodder may follow later. Other topics are also fair game.

Positivity: New Oakland bishop looks to Pope Francis’ example

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 6:00 am

From Oakland, California:

May 31, 2013 / 03:51 pm

Bishop Michael C. Barber, S.J., was ordained and installed as Bishop of Oakland on May 25, promising to follow Pope Francis’ emphasis on caring the poor and the suffering.

“I would like to do for Oakland what Pope Francis is doing for the whole Church,” Bishop Barber said in his remarks at the end of Mass at the Cathedral of Christ the Light.

“My vision is this: the priests take care of the people. The bishop takes care of the priests. And we all take care of the poor, the sick and the suffering – those suffering physically and spiritually,” he said to a filled cathedral.

Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco, the previous Bishop of Oakland, served as the new bishop’s principal consecrator.

The archbishop delivered the homily, saying that Pope Francis “certainly has given us much to think about, and not just think but do, to respond in kind to his example.”

“He is calling us to reexamine our lives, calling us back to basics, to reflect more deeply,” Archbishop Cordileone continued.

“Perhaps, for those in ordained ministry, the most striking of all is his style of preaching. He is so direct and so down-to-earth, getting down to the heart of the matter in a pastoral, personal way.”

Bishop Barber emphasized the importance of collaboration, saying that as a priest he was always grateful “when my superiors allowed – or better yet, made it easier – for me to do my job.”

He said he did not know what he would do about the diocese’s debt.

“But what I do know is this,” he said. “If we are generous with God and generous in taking care of his people, God will take care of us.”

Bishop Barber has roots in Oakland, where his father was born. His mother was born across the bay in San Francisco.

The new bishop thanked former San Francisco Archbishop John Rafael Quinn, who ordained him to the priesthood. He thanked the priest who baptized him, Father John Cummins, who later served as second Bishop of Oakland.

He also had special words for Sister Mary Jude, O.P., who taught him religion in eighth grade.

“You may not realize it, but this sister has taught every person in the diocese of Oakland — because she taught me the faith, and I will hand it on to you,” Bishop Barber said. “In honoring her, I honor all consecrated religious women, all teachers, and all catechists in our diocese. …

Go here for the rest of the story.