December 14, 2013

Latest Vague Plans for Kelo Area Now Barren for 8-1/2 Years: A Parking Garage and ‘Micro Lots’

The nation’s press has long since stopped paying any attention to what has actually happened in the wake of the outrageous Kelo vs. New London Supreme Court ruling in June 2005.

The court’s majority wrote that “The city has carefully formulated a development plan that it believes will provide appreciable benefits to the community, including, but not limited to, new jobs and increased tax revenue.” The quite newsworthy but virtually ignored fact flying in the face of the Supremes’ certitude is that nothing has happened in the affected area for 8-1/2 years. The latest idea for removing the “stain” of Kelo proposed by New London, Connecticut Mayor Daryl Justin Finizio is to place a “green” parking garage and “micro lots” (with micro homes) in the affected Fort Trumbull neighborhood where perfectly acceptable century-old housing used to stand. Excerpts from a New London Day editorial reporting on that paper’s meeting with the mayor follow the jump.

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Saturday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (121413)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:05 am

This open thread will stay at or near the top today. Rules are here. Possible comment fodder may follow. Other topics are also fair game.

Positivity: Study shows importance of online giving options for young Catholics

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 6:01 am

From Washington:

Dec 11, 2013 / 02:04 am

New research reveals that younger Catholics are more likely to give to charitable causes through online donation options and that overall, Catholics are concerned with the needs of the poor in their area.

“The knowledge gained from this report is important for our understanding of the current patterns of giving among Catholics,” said Archbishop Dennis Schnurr of Cincinnati, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ national collections committee.

“We now know that online giving to charitable institutions is rising each year. These results … will allow the Committee to assess our current systems for receiving donations. Moving forward, we will also be better equipped to implement any changes needed in order to reach Catholics, particularly young Catholics, who are giving online.”

The study by Georgetown University’s Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate was commissioned by the bishops’ collections committee, and examined how and why working-age donors participated in online giving. The data was delivered to the bishops Nov. 10 during the bishops’ annual assembly in Baltimore, Md.

The study showed that 32 percent of Catholics have given online donations at some point, and found that Catholics between the ages of 16 and 34 were more likely to feel comfortable with and use online financial platforms than respondents between the ages of 34 and 65, with 73 percent responding that they were at least “somewhat” comfortable with making payments online.

The survey also found that among Catholics who attend Mass less regularly and are not very likely to donate to a second collection, one in four would prefer to give online. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

Second Pass: Year Nine’s Annual ‘Christmas’ and ‘Holiday’ Searches

Filed under: Economy,MSM Biz/Other Bias — Tom @ 12:17 am

Here’s my second pass on Christmas and holiday searches for this year

For those who are relatively new and need background, go here to the first post on search done on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving in 2010.

Here goes (searches were done late Friday night):

Now on to the second set of searches:

  • Christmas layoffs (not in quotes, also excluding the word “challenger” to ensure that about 30 items relating to the mass layoffs report issued by Challenger & Christmas were exluded) — 16,400 (49.3%)
  • Holiday layoffs (not in quotes) — 10,100 (30.3%)
  • Holidays layoffs (not in quotes) — 6,800 (20.4%)

As was the case in Round 1, it looks like the “Christmas” component of the layoff stories, if consistent for the rest of the shopping season, will be the highest in the nine years I’ve been doing this.