April 8, 2014

CNN.com Finally Get to the Leland Yee Story — 13 Days Late

Let it be noted that at 7:17 p.m. on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, CNN.com finally broke down and posted a story on the alleged criminal behavior of California State Senator Leland Yee. The headline at the story by Matt Smith and Jason Carroll (“Feds: Calif. pol Leland Yee schemed to trade arms for campaign cash”) gets to the heart of the matter — unlike the headline (“LAWMAKER YEE PLEADS NOT GUILTY TO FEDERAL CHARGES”) at the Associated Press’s most recent story on Yee. But Smith and Carroll waited until the fourth paragraph to tag Yee as a Democrat (the AP story at least got there at Paragraph 3).

CNN’s story arrives 13 days after Yee’s initial arrest, and 11 days, 9 hours and 58 minutes after a snippy person at the “CNN.com Writers” Twitter account — apparently one Eliott McLaughlin, according to the account’s home page — claimed that its non-coverage of the Yee story was “in line with us covering state senators & state secretary of state races just about never.” Yours truly disproved that assertion in about three minutes on March 29.

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NewsBusted (040814)

Filed under: NewsBusted — Tom @ 6:50 am

Here we go:

Topics:
– Obamacare
– Unemployment
– Healthcare.gov
– Ft. Hood Shooting
– David Letterman Retires
– Stephen Colbert
– Ted Cruz
– Major League Baseball

Best Line: Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz just signed a $1.5 million deal to write a book. … and the New York Times just gave it a bad review.”

Worst Line (actually, a good one; it just stings): “The 2014 Major League Baseball season is finally under way. So better luck next year, Cubs fans.”

Tuesday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (040814)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:05 am

This open thread will stay at or near the top today. Rules are here. Possible comment fodder may follow. Other topics are also fair game.

Positivity: US Navy ‘game-changer’ — converting seawater into fuel

Filed under: Marvels,Positivity,US & Allied Military — Tom @ 6:00 am

From Washington:

The US Navy believes it has finally worked out the solution to a problem that has intrigued scientists for decades: how to take seawater and use it as fuel.

The development of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel is being hailed as “a game-changer” because it would signficantly shorten the supply chain, a weak link that makes any force easier to attack.

The US has a fleet of 15 military oil tankers, and only aircraft carriers and some submarines are equipped with nuclear propulsion.

All other vessels must frequently abandon their mission for a few hours to navigate in parallel with the tanker, a delicate operation, especially in bad weather.

The ultimate goal is to eventually get away from the dependence on oil altogether, which would also mean the navy is no longer hostage to potential shortages of oil or fluctuations in its cost.

Vice Admiral Philip Cullom declared: “It’s a huge milestone for us.”

View galleryDr. Heather Willauer explains how scientists at the …
Dr. Heather Willauer explains how scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC can …
“We are in very challenging times where we really do have to think in pretty innovative ways to look at how we create energy, how we value energy and how we consume it.

“We need to challenge the results of the assumptions that are the result of the last six decades of constant access to cheap, unlimited amounts of fuel,” added Cullom.

“Basically, we’ve treated energy like air, something that’s always there and that we don’t worry about too much. But the reality is that we do have to worry about it.”

US experts have found out how to extract carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas from seawater.

Then, using a catalytic converter, they transformed them into a fuel by a gas-to-liquids process. They hope the fuel will not only be able to power ships, but also planes.

View galleryThis April 2, 2014 US Navy handout image shows a beaker …
This April 2, 2014 US Navy handout image shows a beaker of fuel(right) made from seawater by scienti …
That means instead of relying on tankers, ships will be able to produce fuel at sea.

- ‘Game-changing’ technology -

The predicted cost of jet fuel using the technology is in the range of three to six dollars per gallon, say experts at the US Naval Research Laboratory, who have already flown a model airplane with fuel produced from seawater. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

Still Not News: UC-Santa Barbara Prof Who Admitted Destroying Pro-Life Sign Pleads … Not Guilty

On Friday, University of California Feminist Studies Associate Professor Mireille Miller-Young pled not guilty to misdemeanor theft, battery, and vandalism. To bring those who missed the two previous related posts up to speed: A video at the YouTube site of the Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust (warning: profanity) shows Miller-Young taking a sign away from a participant in a campus pro-life outreach effort. Accompanied by two students, she took the sign back to her office and destroyed it.

Her attorney entered the not guilty plea on Miller-Young’s behalf despite documented admissions to police that, in her words, “I’m stronger so I was able to take the poster,” and that she, in the police report’s words, “was ‘mainly’ responsible for the poster’s destruction because she was the only one with scissors.” Various searches on Ms. Miller-Young’s full name indicate that only three local outlets, the Santa Barbara Independent and two others, filed stories on her plea. No one, as far as I can tell, has noted that Miller-Young continues to carry on without sanction as a $125,000-per-year researcher of “black cultural studies” and “pornography and sex work,” and that her tweets betray no remorse for her destructive actions.

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