November 20, 2017

Positivity: Humble disciple, tireless servant — Solanus Casey beatified in Detroit

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Detroit:

Nov 18, 2017 / 04:35 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Detroit’s beloved Father Solanus Casey has been beatified, with Pope Francis calling him “a humble and faithful disciple of Christ, tireless in serving the poor.”

“The life of our Blessed is an exemplary page of the gospel, lived with human and Christian intensity. It is a page to read with dedication and emotion… and to imitate with fervor,” said Cardinal Angelo Amato, Prefect of the Congregation of the Causes of Saints, who read the Latin-language letter from Pope Francis officially declaring the priest to be blessed.

“In raising this Capuchin to the altars. Pope Francis points him out to the whole Church as a faithful disciple to Christ, the Good Shepherd,” the cardinal said in his homily. “Today the Church and society still need the example and the protection of Father Solanus.”

“Brother and Sisters, let us repeat together: Blessed Father Solanus, pray for us,” he told a crowd of of 60-70,000 gathered for the Nov. 18 Beatification Mass at Detroit’s Ford Field stadium.

Beatification is the final step before possible canonization. Blessed Solanus Casey’s feast day will be July 30.

The Capuchin priest was born to Irish immigrants in Wisconsin on Nov. 25, 1870 and given the baptismal name Bernard Francis. He worked various jobs before entering the Franciscans.

He was ordained a “simplex priest,” meaning he could say Mass but not preach publicly or hear confessions. He was very close to the sick and was highly sought-after throughout his life, in part because of the many physical healings attributed to his blessings and intercession. He was also a co-founder of Detroit’s Capuchin Soup Kitchen in 1929. He served as porter, that is, doorman, at Detroit’s St. Bonaventure Monastery.

At the Mass on Saturday were many bishops, priests, 240 Capuchin friars and about 350 members of the Casey family present, from both the U.S. and Ireland. There were also many poor people in the congregation.

Go here for the rest of the story.

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