January 11, 2018

Cynical Journalists Downplay Walmart’s Tax Cut-Driven Bonuses, Pay Raises, Perks

It takes an especially miserable person to find a reason to complain when more than a million individuals and families are suddenly better off than they were before. Now make that two million in the wake of Walmart’s Thursday announcement that it is granting bonuses of up to $1,000 to every employee, raising its base wage to $11 an hour, enhancing its paid-leave benefits, and providing a new adoption-assistance benefit. It’s early but the media whining has seemingly increased.

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Not National News: Costco Pushes Back Against Seattle’s Sugary Drink Tax

The City of Seattle probably didn’t expect pushback from Costco, seen by many on the left as retail’s “anti-Walmart,” after its “sugary drink” tax of 1.75 cents per ounce went into effect January 1. But that is exactly what has happened. In moves the national press, which largely supports such taxes, has thus far ignored, Costco is itemizing the built-in cost of the tax on its Seattle store’s shelf tags, and informing customers that they won’t pay the tax if they shop at one of two other Costco stores outside Seattle’s city limits.

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Thursday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (011118)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

Positivity: Students use Harry Potter to give teacher a gift to see colors

Filed under: Education,Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Dayton, Indiana (HT Weasel Zippers):

Published 8:00 p.m. ET Jan. 4, 2018

A group of students surprised their teacher Monday with a rare surprise — the gift of color.

Beau Scott, the 4th and 5th grade higher ability teacher at Dayton Elementary School, is color blind. At stoplights, the colors look the same.

A few of his students wanted to do something special for him. Claire De Lon, a 5th grader, and Nori Patterson, a 4th grader, both were trying to raise money for color-seeing glasses for Scott.

“It must be really hard for him to see that way,” Claire said.

Nori said she and her family wanted to do something nice for Scott, and the two girls found out they were both trying to do the same thing.

Scott is one of Claire and Nori’s favorite teachers, so it made sense to do something for him.

So the two joined forces and started to raise money for the glasses.

Claire sold decorative mice with candy cane tails, and students in the class donated anywhere from $5 to $10 each to raise a little more than $300 for Scott’s glasses.

Both Nori and Claire were nervous because, in some cases, the glasses don’t work for everyone.

“I know he would be grateful for the gift from everyone, but I hope it works,” Nori said.

The students told Scott they wanted to perform a Harry Potter “magic trick.” So when he closed his eyes, the students gave him a wand, a broom and his Quidditch goggles — also known as the color-seeing glasses.

Then, on the count of three, the kids held up a sign saying “Merry Christmas” on different colors of paper.

At first, he didn’t notice the change, he said. But after lifting the glasses slightly, he could see the difference.

“Oh my gosh, guys,” he said. “Oh my gosh. This is awesome. I can see the colors.” …

Go here for the rest of the story.