February 12, 2018

NBC’s Katie Couric: Skating Is a Mode of Transportation in The Netherlands

Filed under: MSM Biz/Other Bias,MSM Biz/Other Ignorance — Tom @ 2:42 pm

In a monumental gaffe, NBC’s Katie Couric, in covering the opening ceremonies at the Olympics, betrayed epic ignorance about the Netherlands in attributing its rich tradition of great speed skating Olympic performances to skating being “a mode of transportation” there. She then added that skating is important “because of lots of canals that freeze in the winter.”

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WashPost: Wages Rose Before Trump; They Didn’t, But They Did in 2017

The propagandists disguised as “fact-checkers” at the Washington Post unleashed pent-up frustration Wednesday when they evaluated President Donald Trump’s February 5 claim that wages are, “for the first time in many years, rising.” They gave Trump’s claim its worst possible evaluation of “Four Pinocchios,” i.e., a “whopper.” Too bad for the Post that detailed work published by Reuters two days earlier had already debunked its evaluation.

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Fox Sports …

Filed under: General — Tom @ 9:37 am

… hasn’t covered NCAA women’s basketball since last year’s tournament.

At all. In any way, shape, or form.

Not one in-house story in 10 months.

A review of the archives indicates that the decision to abandon video until tournament time was made in December 2016, as there is no story present between then and last year’s tournament. (I believe that Fox went to all-video across the board with no stories except Associated Press game recaps at about that time.)

Fox deciding not to devote video effort to the sport until tourney time is one thing, and perhaps can be defended. But that’s not an excuse for having no results, conference standings, or polls.

Even to get to the home page for the sport, you have to figure out that it’s buried in the NCAA Men’s basketball section (!) under “More” — which almost no one will do. That’s not just ridiculous. It’s insulting.

I don’t expect Fox Sports to give the women anywhere near equal time with the men, because there isn’t equal interest, or even to do anything more than post results, standings, and polls, which would take minimal time and effort (if any, given that such things are fed in from elsewhere).

Fox apparently believes that absolutely no one cares even a little about NCAA women’s basketball until tournament time.

That’s obviously false, and I cry foul.

And this assumes that Fox will even recognize the existence of the women’s tournament this year. Given the 10-month blackout, that may be a brave assumption.

Monday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (021218)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

Positivity: Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address

Filed under: Positivity,Taxes & Government,US & Allied Military — Tom @ 5:55 am

This post became a BizzyBlog tradition on Lincoln’s birthday in 2012. Bolds and several additional paragraph breaks are mine.

March 4, 1865:

Fellow Countrymen:

AT this second appearing to take the oath of the Presidential office there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then a statement somewhat in detail of a course to be pursued seemed fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented. The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.

AbrahamLincoln

On the occasion corresponding to this four years ago all thoughts were anxiously directed to an impending civil war. All dreaded it, all sought to avert it. While the inaugural address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, insurgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it without war—seeking to dissolve the Union and divide effects by negotiation. Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and the war came.

One-eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was somehow the cause of the war. To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war, while the Government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the territorial enlargement of it.

Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God’s assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men’s faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged.

The prayers of both could not be answered. That of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes. “Woe unto the world because of offenses; for it must needs be that offenses come, but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.” If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him?

Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman’s two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said “the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.”

With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation’s wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.