April 19, 2014

Sign, Signs … A $17 an Hour Sign?

Filed under: Business Moves,Economy,Immigration,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 9:32 am

Here’s one:

$17perHourSign0414

Wow, that’s impressive. Guess where it was found:

WalmartLogoOnBuilding

Huh? Walmart? Yep:

WalmartCaption0414

It’s very safe to say that $17 an hour to work at Walmart is a higher rate than virtually “any” city outside of North Dakota, not just “many.”

Some takeaways:

  • There’s opportunity for those whose personal circumstances allow it to better themselves simply by moving. Those who live in a high-unemployment area who could move without personal consequence and don’t really have no right to complain. If Wal-Mart’s paying $17 an hour, imagine what you can make at skilled jobs in North Dakota. (Yes, the cost of living in North Dakota has shot up, but don’t even try to argue that it’s twice that seen in other states.)
  • The law of supply and demand works. If there’s a shortage of workers, employers have to pay more to get them.
  • The law of supply and demand works in the other direction too. If Congress grants amnesty to millions of workers already here, and each of them therefore gets to bring in relatives, and more illegal immigrants arrive in anticipation of the next amnesty, wages will be stay low or go lower. The Wall Street Journal and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce may like that, and the Democratic Party may like the electoral majorities such a move will almost certainly guarantee, but the average American worker’s standard of living will deteriorate even more than we’ve seen already during six years of slack economic conditions.

AP Howler: Admin’s Good Friday Timing of Latest Keystone Pipeline Delay a ‘Surprise’

It either doesn’t take much to surprise Josh Lederman and Dana Capiello at the Associated Press, aka the Administration’s Press, or they have very short memories.

The AP pair described the Obama State Department’s Friday afternoon statement (roughly 3:30 p.m., based on the “9 hours ago” result returned in a Google search on the document’s title at 12:30 a.m. ET) that it would “provide more time” for eight federal agencies involved to submit “their views on the proposed Keystone Pipeline Project” as a “a surprise announcement Friday as Washington was winding down for Easter.” It’s as if something like this has never happened before during the Obama administration. Well, yes it has.

(more…)

April 18, 2014

AP: After Years of Touting It, Dems Told Not to Say ‘Recovery’

In a Friday morning dispatch which comes off more as a set of election instructions from “Democratic strategists” than as a real news report, David Espo at the Associated Press, aka the Administration’s Press, wanted to make sure that political operatives who don’t read boring pollster reports still get the message: Don’t use the word “recovery” during your fall campaign.

In the course of his missive, Espo falsely claimed that economic growth since the recession officially ended has continued unbroken, and failed to remind his audience that the party has trotted out “recovery” themes several times, only to see historically weak economic and employment results each time. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds are mine):

(more…)

April 17, 2014

Initial Unemployment Claims (041714): 304K SA; Raw Claims Up 5.8% From Previous Week

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 6:58 am

Predictions: 

Seasonal adjustment factors:

  • Week ended April 12, 2014 — 104.6
  • Week ended April 13, 2013 — 101.9

Raw claims:

  • Week ended April 5, 2014 — 298,393 (before possible revision; Update: revised to 300,189)
  • Week ended April 13, 2013 — 359,415

For the predictions above to come true, raw claims will need to be 330,000 or lower (330K divided by 1.046 is 315K, rounded).

That’s way too easy. We really should expect a seasonally adjusted value of 287,000 or below, which would mean that raw claims came in at 300,000 or below, or just above what we’ve seen in raw claims during the past two weeks. It’s difficult to see why raw claims should come in any higher, unless conditions are deteriorating. So to be clear, a seasonally adjusted reading of 295K or higher should be seen as BAD news.

We’ll see here at 8:30 a.m. (Note: The Department of Labor began issuing the report in PDF format last week).

_______________________________

UPDATE: The DOL home page says 304,000, but the new report isn’t at the link yet.

HERE IT IS (the permanent link works):

SEASONALLY ADJUSTED DATA

In the week ending April 12, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 304,000, an increase of 2,000 from the previous week’s revised level. The previous week’s level was revised up by 2,000 from 300,000 to 302,000. The 4-week moving average was 312,000, a decrease of 4,750 from the previous week’s revised average. This is the lowest level for this average since October 6, 2007 when it was 302,000. The previous week’s average was revised up by 500 from 316,250 to 316,750.

… UNADJUSTED DATA

The advance number of actual initial claims under state programs, unadjusted, totaled 317,701 in the week ending April 12, an increase of 17,512 (or 5.8 percent) from the previous week. The seasonal factors had expected an increase of 16,022 (or 5.3 percent) from the previous week. There were 359,415 initial claims in the comparable week in 2013.

Well, the change in “the seasonal factors” doesn’t make sense. Both the week ended April 5 and the one ended April 12 were full, five-day, early-spring business weeks, and there really shouldn’t have been much change in raw claims from the first week to the second. But there was.

So, though the press surely won’t see it as such, this is a disappointment.

_______________________________

UPDATE: I haven’t mentioned this in a few weeks, and need to remind readers of it every so often, with a bit of an update.

“Covered employment,” or the number of workers who would be eligible for unemployment benefits if they were laid off or let go, peaked at 133.902 million at the end of 2008. After over five years of “recovery,” it’s currently 130.938 million, or 2.2% below that peak.

Given that private-sector employment is finally back to its pre-recession peak, this tells me that there has been a noticeable shift in the workforce towards people who aren’t eligible for unemployment benefits, i.e., temps and part-timers.

April 16, 2014

Homebuilding Data Misses Despite Weather-Clearing Hopes

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 9:20 am

March was going to be the month the housing industry shook off its bad-weather doldrums and came roaring back due to all kinds of pent-up demand, and … Uh, not really.

From the Census Bureau:

Privately-owned housing units authorized by building permits in March were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 990,000. This is 2.4 percent (±1.0%) below the revised February rate of 1,014,000, but is 11.2 percent (±1.1%) above the March 2013 estimate of 890,000.

Single-family authorizations in March were at a rate of 592,000; this is 0.5 percent (±1.0%)* above the revised February figure of 589,000. [1] Authorizations of units in buildings with five units or more were at a rate of 370,000 in March.

HOUSING STARTS

Privately-owned housing starts in March were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 946,000. This is 2.8 percent (±14.7%)* above the revised February estimate of 920,000, but is 5.9 percent (±8.4%)* below the March 2013 rate of 1,005,000. [2]

Single-family housing starts in March were at a rate of 635,000; this is 6.0 percent (±15.5%)* above the revised February figure of 599,000. [3] The March rate for units in buildings with five units or more was 292,000.

Notes:

[1] — Actual single-family permits of 50,800 slightly trailed last year’s 51,400. It was the second month in a row actual single-family permits have trailed the previous year.

[2] — Actual starts, at 79,100, were 5.0 percent below the 83,300 seen in March 2013. It too trailed the previous year for the second straight month.

[3] – Actual single-family starts of 54,000 were slightly above the 52,500 seen in March 2013.

Business Insider’s predictions were for 1 million seasonally adjusted annual permits (the report came in 1.0 percent lower) and seasonally adjusted annual 975,000 starts (the report came in 3.0 percent lower). February’s original figures in each category were revised up slightly.

The message from the year-over-year comparisons is, at least for now, that the homebuilding industry has flattened out. If that’s indeed the case, it’s doing so at a completely unacceptable level signifying malaise (and there’s an outside chance that we may really be witnessing the beginning of a decline).

________________________________________

UPDATE: The Associated Press’s predictable near-whitewash notes that (seasonally adjusted annual) starts “rose 30.7 percent in the Northeast and jumped 65.5 percent in the Midwest” from February to March. The other two regions fell. That doesn’t bode well for future months.

April 15, 2014

In Covering House’s Passage of Ryan Budget, AP’s Taylor Presumes $600B Annual Deficits Are ‘Sustainable’

Monday afternoon at the Associated Press, aka the Administration’s Press, Andrew Taylor predictably described the House’s passage of the Ryan Budget in shrill terms (in order of appearance): “A slashing budget blueprint”; “Sweeping budget cuts”; balances the budget “at the expense of poor people and seniors”; “sharp cuts to domestic programs”; “staking out a hard line for the future”; and “tough cuts.” Naturally, he failed to disclose that the Ryan budget increases the federal government’s total outlays in each and every fiscal year from 2015 to 2024, with the final projected year coming in at $4.995 trillion, or 42 percent above the $3.523 trillion in spending the Congressional Budget Office predicted yesterday for fiscal 2014.

In the process of performing the AP’s usual hatchet job, Taylor let loose with a howler about the federal government’s ability to continue on its current financial path. The AP reporter may also have inadvertently let something slip into his narrative about the viability of a cherished government program, something which is a deep, dark secret to most Americans, but is quite well-known to those who watch things more closely:

(more…)

April 14, 2014

AP’s Rugaber: Continued Large Deficits Signify ‘Improvement in the Nation’s Finances’

On Thursday, Christopher Rugaber’s assignment at the Associated Press was to cover that day’s release of Uncle Sam’s Monthly Treasury Statement for March.

If the AP economics writer had limited the scope of his coverage to the statement itself, his coverage would have been passed muster. But, as he and his AP colleagues so often do, Rugaber felt it was duty to offer what he must have thought was helpful analysis. He wrote that March’s reported $37 billion deficit, an admitted significant improvement over the March 2013 result, even after adjusting for timing differences in end-of-month receipts and outlays, was “the latest sign of improvement in the nation’s finances.” The last time I checked, running significantly in the red is not an improvement. It really signifies less rapid deterioration, especially since fiscal 2014 in full is still expected to end with deficit of over $500 billion.

(more…)

April 13, 2014

Reuters Covers Two Dozen Anti-Tech Protesters in San Francisco, Ignores Their $3B Demand, Call to End Capitalism

On Friday, Reuters dispatched Sarah McBride, a San Francisco area reporter, to cover a protest by two dozen people. Seriously.

According to the headline at McBride’s story, the presence of these two dozen protesters demonstrated that “San Francisco tech money protests intensify.” McBride utterly failed to describe the protester’s ultimate goals: lots and lots of money and an end to capitalism. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds are mine throughout this post):

(more…)

Regulatory Tyranny Flies Under the Radar

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 6:59 am

Courtesy of Barack Obama’s Department of Labor.

_______________________________________

This column went up at PJ Media and was teased here at BizzyBlog on Friday.

_______________________________________

While those who cherish what’s left of our freedoms are rightly concerned about the sacking and the blacklisting of Mozilla’s Brendan Eich, Democrats’ media-coordinated lying about and demonization of the Koch brothers, and other visible evidence of unfettered intolerance, the regulatory tyranny (“arbitrary or unrestrained exercise of power; despotic abuse of authority”) which has become the default modus operandi of Barack Obama’s administration continues unabated.

Three examples of the quiet despotic work being carried out by Dear Leader’s government come from the Department of Labor, where Tom Perez succeeded the scandal-plagued Hilda Solis last year.

One lightly reported element of Obama “equal pay” initiative — an effort which is based on an objectively false premise, and which the press almost joyfully admits is primarily about motivating uninformed voters — is an “executive order banning federal contractors from retaliating against employees who discuss their compensation.”

This unwanted and harmful interference with a common and time-tested employer practice is bad enough. What’s far less well-known and far worse is that Obama has, in USA Today’s words, also told Perez to “to establish new regulations requiring federal contractors to submit to the Department of Labor summary data on compensation paid to their employees, including data by sex and race.” DOL says this information will “encourage voluntary compliance with equal pay laws” and enable “more targeted enforcement.” Trust me; the latter is far more important than the former.

This information will provide a handy litigation roadmap for DOL and Eric Holder’s Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. It will also be a bonanza for trial lawyers, who will immediately demand this information in discovery any time they bring a pay-related legal action. Most trial lawyers “just so happen” to favor leftist candidates and causes. There is one problem which I expect the judicial system will blow off: The only way to ensure that the submitted data is complete and probative would be to force each and every employee in America to declare their race, a provision which is currently optional. I would suggest that every job applicant alarmed by this development should henceforth exercise their option to not disclose. Those who are currently employed should see if they can undo any previous disclosure.

Further interfering with employer prerogatives, Richard Griffin, who is general counsel at Perez’s National Labor Relations Board, intends “to give unions a veto over a unionized employer’s decision to relocate.” Predictably, he plans to achieve his goal through subterfuge:

Griffin’s guidance will be to order an employer to be prosecuted not on the basis of what the law is but on the law as Griffin would like it to be. This will give the board an opportunity to change the law (though the change will be prospective — the employer who is prosecuted will not be punished for violating the new rule).

Finally, DOL’s Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has begun to implement an interpretation which should have set off alarm bells when it was first disclosed a year ago, and clearly didn’t:

The new interpretation from Richard Fairfax, Deputy Assistant Secretary of OSHA, to Steve Sallman, Health and Safety Specialist with the United Steelworkers Union, asserts that OSHA’s standard for Representatives of Employers and Employees allows workers at establishments without collective bargaining agreements to designate outside representatives or union agents to represent them during OSHA inspections.

This ruling contradicts the plain language of OSHA’s governing regulation …

As if they care.

Earlier this week, Greta Van Susteren, in an otherwise informative report, allowed OSHA to falsely claim that “allowing non-employee third party representative to accompany OSHA inspectors on walk around inspections is not a new OSHA policy … if that third party representative is necessary to conduct a thorough investigation.” Exactly how can a planted union “representative,” i.e., thug, who probably hasn’t done related or even any blue-collar work in years, possibly be of any assistance?

Van Susteren interviewed CEO Brent Southwell of Professional Janitorial Service, whose company has over 1,000 employees. Despite no employee-initiated complaints and “26 years without a single OSHA write-up,” Southwell disclosed that OSHA had recently visited him three separate times, in each instance accompanied by a representative of the Service Employees International Union. How oddly coincidental it is that PJS “is currently suing SEIU for $9 million” for alleged slander.

These actions, all of which appear to be inevitable and/or unstoppable, make a mockery of the administration’s oft-professed interest in economic growth. The prediction of a former NLRB chairman about its new “can’t relocate” rule really applies to all three DOL moves: They “will hasten those companies’ demise and harm the economy.”

Why would any sane person run a company or hire any or more employees in this hostile environment? A partial answer that question is that fewer Americans are choosing to start up new businesses, and those who do are deciding not to put anyone besides their founders on the payroll. The small firm start-up rate in recent years has been miles below where it was in the 1980s, and employment growth at such firms has been painfully slow.

Another online site recently noted that if its budget was seen as a separate economy, the federal government would be the third-largest in the world. Of course, the problem with seeing Uncle Sam’s enterprise as an economy is that it produces very little of value beyond providing national security, which is naturally where this administration is cutting military and diplomatic corners. Despite the Keynesians’ claims, sending out $2 trillion in entitlement checks per year is not an economy-advancing enterprise.

In such a vast organization, it’s not unreasonable to believe that a great deal of despotic behavior is going undetected. To cite just one accidentally discovered example, who would have known about EPA Regional Administrator Al Armendariz’s preemptive, evidence-free war on fracking if he hadn’t been caught on tape in 2012 telling an audience of coworkers that his regulatory philosophy was to “crucify” and “make examples of” alleged environmental offenders?

Unfortunately, too many on the right who should be monitoring internal developments and screaming when abuses are found, especially in Congress, have shown that they’re more interested in reelection and building their coffers than in the blocking and tackling inherent in their assigned oversight roles.

Thus, while only suffering minor setbacks from time to time, the regulatory tyranny advances.

April 11, 2014

Virtually Unreported: Mortgage Loan Market’s 2013-2014 Collapse

Associated Press stories today on the quarterly earnings releases of Wells Fargo (unbylined) and JPMorgan Chase (by Steve Rothwell) essentially mocked the nearly continuous monthly stream of reports the wire service’s economics writers, particularly Martin Crutsinger and Chris Rugaber, have generated about the “housing recovery” during at least the past year.

The Wells Fargo story disclosed that the nation’s largest mortgage lender “funded $36 billion worth of mortgages in the first quarter, down sharply from $109 billion a year earlier.” The following graphic from the bank’s detailed financial report tells the full story:

(more…)

Latest PJ Media Column (‘Regulatory Tyranny Flies Under the Radar’) Is Up (UPDATE: OSHA Targeting Non-Union Auto Industry in the South)

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 10:56 am

It’s here.

I will post it here at BizzyBlog on Sunday morning (link won’t work until then) after the blackout expires.

__________________________________

UPDATE: Just five hours after the column went to print, an email from NetRightDaily reported that OSHA is deliberately targeting nonunion auto products manufacturers in the Southeast … with union representatives tagging along

Is OSHA trying to unionize southern auto parts manufacturers?

… The heightened targeting in the southeast comes on the heels of a special “Regional Emphasis Program to reduce workplace exposures to safety hazards associated in the Auto Parts Supplier Industry” ordered by the agency on January 15.

These three states alone, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, although they make up just 9.7 percent of auto parts manufacturers, already constitute 26 percent of OSHA inspections for that industry group.

… Rep. Martha Roby (R-Ala.) is furious about the targeted discrimination in her home state of Alabama. In a letter to Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, Roby wrote, “Absent a compelling rationale grounded in fact, OSHA’s targeted enforcement tactics become susceptible to charges that they are at best arbitrary, and at worst discriminatory.”

Roby also complained about a new Labor rule that allows union organizers to tag along OSHA inspections in non-union shops, raising the specter that union bosses may now be directing the agency’s targeting.

When coupled with the regional targeting in the southeast, it begins to look a lot like OSHA is attempting to unionize southern auto parts manufacturers that are beating Detroit on price by keeping labor costs low.

But regardless of the motivation of the targeting, it appears these factories have been the targets of a pattern of discrimination by the agency, raising significant constitutional due process concerns.

Due process? Little people apparently don’t get that in Tom Perez’s Department of Labor.

April 10, 2014

Initial Unemployment Claims (041014): 300K SA; Raw Claims Edge Up 1.3% From Previous Week, Which Was Itself Revised Up

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 8:26 am

Predictions:

Seasonal Adjustment Factors:

  • Week ended April 5, 2014 — 99.3
  • Week ended April 6, 2013 — 102.7

Raw Claims:

  • Week ended March 29, 2014 — 294,862, revised up from 289,535 initially reported last week, leading to an upward revision to 332,000 of last week’s original 326,000 seasonally adjusted figure.
  • Week ended April 6, 2013 — 356,935

That’s a pretty big upward revision to last week’s numbers.

For today’s prediction to end up accurate, raw claims will need to be 318,000 or below (318K divided by .993 is 320K, rounded). That should happen. If it doesn’t, we have a problem. To be worry-free, today’s the seasonally adjusted number really should come in at 300,000 or below (Update: AND stay there next week), which would mean that raw claims barely moved up from last week’s adjusted figure.

This is especially true because last week’s raw claims, after revision, were 7.6 percent higher than the previous week (all weeks involved are “clean” weeks involving no holidays).  We really can’t afford to see them head up much further.

8:30 a.m.: DOL has announced 300,000 at its home page.

8:33 a.m.: The report is out (permanent link — DOL has gone to presenting these weekly reports in PDF format from here on out; also notice some additional verbiage, which may or may not be legitimate enhancements):

SEASONALLY ADJUSTED DATA

In the week ending April 5, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 300,000, a decrease of 32,000 from the previous week’s revised level. The last time initial claims were this low was May 12, 2007 when they were 297,000. The previous week’s level was revised up by 6,000 from 326,000 to 332,000. The 4-week moving average was 316,250, a decrease of 4,750 from the previous week’s revised average. The previous week’s average was revised up by 1,500 from 319,500 to 321,000.

There were no special factors impacting this week’s initial claims.

… UNADJUSTED DATA

The advance number of actual initial claims under state programs, unadjusted, totaled 298,393 in the week ending April 5, an increase of 3,531 (or 1.2 percent) from the previous week. The seasonal factors had expected an increase of 34,865 (or 11.8 percent) from the previous week. There were 356,935 initial claims in the comparable week in 2013.

“The seasonal factors had expected an increase of 34,865 (or 11.8 percent) from the previous week.” Excuse me, but what does THAT mean? (I intend to find out, just not immediately. Update: See below.)

A year-over-year comparison of raw claims is meaningless because last year’s comparable week was Easter Week.

While the press will sing hosannahs over the 300K seasonally adjusted number. The truth is that raw claims basically held steady (up by about 1.3%). That of course is better than seeing them zoom up. But given last week’s big upward revision, we really should see if today’s raw claims figure holds in next week’s report.

____________________________________

UPDATE: As to the comparative language (“lowest since May 2007″), let’s see if DOL continues to provide it when seasonally adjusted claims go up.

UDPATE 2: What the statement “The seasonal factors had expected an increase of 34,865 (or 11.8 percent) from the previous week” really means is “For seasonally adjusted claims to come the same as or better than last week, raw claims needed to be 329,727 or lower.”

294,862 (last week’s revised raw claims) plus the 34,865 just cited is 329,727 raw claims.

329,727 divided by .992 (this week’s seasonal adjustment factor) is 332,000 (last week’s revised seasonally adjusted claims, rounded).

Seasonal adjustment factors are abstract things which don’t “expect” anything.

If DOL is going to try to do something comparative to the prior week, my language is vastly better, but I’m not convinced that it’s worth it to even bother with the narrative. It’s giving the seasonal factors too much presumptive credit for somehow being precise. They’re anything but that.

It will also be interesting to see how this narrative changes during weeks when raw claims come in higher than the seasonal factors might supposedly indicate.

April 7, 2014

Establishment Press Lets CFPB Whistleblower Story Alleging Harassment and Racism Stay Buried at Politico

The primary objection to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), created as part of the mammoth Dodd-Frank legislation passed in 2010, has been its unaccountability. It “is ensconced within the Federal Reserve,” which frees it from congressional and presidential oversight. Even the Fed “is statutorily prohibited from ‘intervening’ in CFPB affairs.”

It should surprise no one that Richard Cordray, the unaccountable agency’s director, seems to believe that he and his kingdom are untouchable. Cordray, a Democrat who not coincidentally has been mentioned as a possible down-the-road candidate to be Ohio’s governor, has, according to a whistleblower, presided over a “‘pervasive’ culture of intimidation and hostility within the bureau.” Further, according to the Washington Free Beacon’s coverage of the whistleblower’s testimony at a House Committee on Financial Services hearing, Cordray personally told the whistleblower “to have her attorneys ‘back down.’” a Wednesday story at the Politico by M.J. Lee represents nearly the full extent of establishment press coverage I could locate. Excerpts from Lee’s Politico story follow the jump.

(more…)

April 5, 2014

NYT Gives Print Op-ed Space to Venezuela’s Maduro, Consigns Responses to Web, Ignores Growing Repression

On April 1 for its April 2 print edition, the New York Times allowed Venezuelan dictator Nicolas Maduro to hold forth in an op-ed about how wondrously the country has been ruled since 1998, mostly by the late Bolivarian thug Hugo Chavez and during the past year by himself.

Maduro’s piece made the Times’s print edition. The Times posted letters objecting to Maduro’s characterizations of his country from Ramón Guillermo Aveledo, an opposition leader, and Congressman Edward R. Royce, but appears not to have printed them. I say that because there is no indication at the letters themselves that they were printed, and because certain other letters on unrelated matters are (examples here and here; scroll to the bottom in each instance). The Times did post and print a letter from Florida Senator Marco Rubio on Friday for Saturday’s print edition. The Times, to likely no one’s surprise, has been lax in reporting ongoing developments in that deeply troubled country.

(more…)

Hillary Fails to Name a Single Accomplishment at State Dept.

Several weeks ago, MRC-TV’s Dan Joseph visited the Democratic Party’s winter meeting to see if attendees could name a single tangible of Hillary Clinton during her tenure as Secretary of State. They couldn’t. It turns out that Hillary Clinton herself can’t even do that.

Remember how Texas Governor Rick Perry was mercilessly ridiculed in the press for his 2011 debate brain cramp when he couldn’t identify the third of three federal government agencies he would eliminate? At the Women of the World Summit in New York City on Thursday — an event held at, of all places, the David H. Koch Theater (you can’t make this stuff up) — Mrs. Clinton rambled on and on in a response to a question about what she was most proud of in looking at her time as Secretary of State, but never identified even one specific accomplishment (HT Capitol City Project):

(more…)