August 11, 2017

David Brooks (!) Calls For Google’s CEO to Resign Over Damore Firing

Filed under: Business Moves,Economy — Tom @ 8:41 pm

On Friday, in an op-ed which made the paper’s print edition, David Brooks, the alleged conservative commentator at the New York Times, surprised more than a few people by calling for Google CEO Sundar Pichai to resign over his awful handling of now ex-employee James Damore’s “Echo Chamber” document. Brooks identified the five key players in the drama, and directed sharp criticism at three of them: Google’s diversity officer, the press, and ultimately Pichai.

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WashPost: Anarchists Are About ‘More Than Just Smashing Windows’

The Washington Post published a 2,000-word story Thursday which attempted to portray DC-area anarchists who attempted to disrupt and ruin President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January as being interested in “more than just smashing windows.” The best answer to what “more” is in Perry Stein’s report is that it’s about destroying as much property belonging to others as possible once it’s clear that attempts to stop or seriously disrupt planned events have failed — oh, and getting away with it.

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Friday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (081117)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: This priest preserves Iraqi culture found in historic manuscripts

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Rome:

Aug 9, 2017 / 03:04 am

As Iraq and surrounding areas face the destruction of many of the region’s archaeological treasures, one priest and his fellow Dominicans are preserving the area’s history and culture through an archive of Christian and other religious manuscripts.

“First, we save them (the manuscripts) physically, materially. We bring them to safety and bring them with us at the peril of our lives, of course. But, we also electronically copy them and number them and by doing this, the book or manuscript becomes immortal,” Fr. Najeeb Michaeel told CNA.

“In reality, I did not save this history just because I am a Christian. I saved this because I am human and everything that is human interests me, like the lives of human beings and of a human being become much more valuable when he has roots.”

Fr. Najeeb Michaeel is a Dominican friar and priest from Iraq. In 1990 he created the Center for the Digitization of Eastern Manuscripts to help digitize documents and archives of letters, paintings, and photos.

Since 2007 Fr. Najeeb and those who help him have moved and protected manuscripts from likely destruction at the hands of Islamist extremists. So far, the group has digitally preserved more than 8,000 previously unpublished manuscripts, dating from the 10th to the 19th centuries.

“Culture and civilization were born here and today it is a bath of blood and the destruction is almost complete and total, but even with all of this we keep the hope for a better future,” Fr. Najeeb said.

The question today is why we do not work to protect these villages, and to keep these things from destruction, he asked, and urged people to try to influence their governments to protect these historical places.

This collection of manuscripts “presents a small selection to say to the world, here are our roots, you need to help us, you need to help protect us. We do not have the right, as an international community, to sell arms to kill one another and not at the same time promote culture and the rights of man.”

Since 1750 the many manuscripts had been kept in the library of the Dominican monastery in Mosul. They were moved from the monastery starting in 2007, amid the backdrop of increased violence against Christians and other minorities at the hands of extremist groups. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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August 10, 2017

AP Ignores Almost All Details of UAW-Fiat Chrysler Training Center Scandal

Tuesday morning, the Associated Press left no doubt that it does not want to see detailed news of the outrageous United Auto Workers-Fiat Chrysler training scandal spread beyond Metro Detroit. In an unbylined item which digested far longer reports seen at Detroit’s major newspapers down to five paragraphs, the wire service kept the union out of its headline, failed to mention the union until the fourth paragraph, and omitted almost all of the details which caused a Chrysler financial analyst to plead guilty to his role in the conspiracy.

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NPR Pushes Unproven Claim That Some Female Google Employees Stayed Home Due to ‘Echo Chamber’ Memo

Monday evening, National Public Radio published a tweet about the Google-free speech controversy that raised eyebrows and brought on torrents of ridicule, namely that “some women at the company skipped work today, upset by the leaked memo” written by now-fired software engineer James Damore. It turns out that the basis for the claim is so extraordinarily thin that it shouldn’t have been reported.

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Thursday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (081017)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 12:00 pm

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: After years of exile, Dominican sisters return to Iraq’s Nineveh Plain

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 11:55 am

From Erbil, Iraq:

Aug 9, 2017 / 04:32 pm

After three years in exile from Iraq’s Nineveh Plain while it was occupied by the Islamic State, the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena are returning to their homeland to face the daunting challenge of rebuilding their destroyed communities.

“Three years ago, we left our homes at night to the unknown. We started a journey of displacement, exile and questioning,” stated an Aug. 6 open letter from the Dominican Sisters in Erbil.

“Despite everything, we always dreamed of going back and finding our houses safe and sound, just as we left them. We strongly wished that we would return and kindle our candles for prayers, harvest our grapes, and read our books,” the letter continued.

In 2014, the Nineveh Plain was overtaken by the Islamic State, forcing tens of thousands into exile and displacement. The Nineveh Plain territory lies between the city of Mosul, the country’s second-largest city, and Iraqi Kurdistan.

In the fall of 2016, two years after the Islamic State claimed the Nineveh territory, Iraqi forces made significant military gains and liberated the Nineveh Plain. Many scattered families were able to return to their towns with hope for the future.

“God showered us with His graces as our towns were liberated, one after the other; ISIS was defeated and the Plain of Nineveh seems to have been liberated,” the Dominican Sisters wrote.

While the territory is now seemingly safe from Islamic State forces, the Sisters said that it “does not mean that the Plain of Nineveh is entirely cleansed from that mentality.”

Upon returning to their homes, many found graffiti on the walls in their towns that read “we’re going to break your crosses,” and “you have no place with us.” Some churches were found to have battle instructions etched on the walls, with piles of deadly chemicals in the corners.

In addition, the physical damage left behind is overwhelming. Upwards of 6,000 homes are in need of repair or complete rebuilding just in the city of Bakhdida, also known as Qaraqosh. The families who still have standing houses are few and far between. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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August 9, 2017

CNN’s Baldwin Twice Falsely Claims Google Engineer Wants Women Away From Computers

The establishment press’s failure to properly describe James Damore’s 10-page “Echo Chamber” critique at Google was entirely predictable and pervasive. Brooke Baldwin took it to a new level Tuesday on CNN’s Newsroom show, as she falsely claimed — twice — that the now-fired software engineer doesn’t like women being around computers.

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Wednesday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (080917)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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RIP, Glen Campbell

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

Extraordinary guitarist:

CBS’s report on his death:

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August 8, 2017

CNN Reporter Lies About and Smears Google Engineer’s ‘Echo Chamber’ Critique

Given the fundamental dishonesty of almost any discussion of workplace “diversity” and “inclusion” in the leftist media, it was inevitable that someone would grossly mischaracterize the critique written by now ex-Google employee James Damore as an ode to male chauvinism. CNN has done just that, hysterically and falsely claiming that Damore argued that “women aren’t suited for tech jobs for ‘biological’ reasons.” He did no such thing — and on Twitter, CNNMoney.com writer Jackie Wattles essentially admitted it.

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Positivity: What makes Vivaldi unique among composers? He was a priest.

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 10:50 am

From Venice, Italy:

Aug 6, 2017 / 04:02 pm

While Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” echoes in concert halls and elevators around the world, for some, his greatest masterpieces are not the scores resonating spring, summer, fall and winter, but rather his sacred music.

Although less known, Vivaldi’s sacred music compositions, according to a researcher and expert on the musician’s life, is probably his greatest contribution to music – featuring an altogether unprecedented combination of deep spirituality and the contemporary trends of the time.

And this profound personal spirituality was rooted in what is likely a little-known fact for many: Antonio Vivaldi was a Catholic priest.

“I’m going to give you the most bizarre idea. Think of the Pope, who represents priests, spiritual things, and then you’ve got Jimi Hendrix, a superb guitarist. You put them together and you’ve got Vivaldi,” British researcher Micky White told CNA Aug. 1.

It’s a combination altogether “bizarre,” she said. “Vivaldi the priest, deeply spiritual, comes out in his music. Jimi Hendrix Vivaldi you’ve heard in the Four Seasons; it’s the most bizarre piece of music.”

“It’s timely, a priest wrote it,” and it’s meshed with the modern style of the day – a combination of two things that are essentially “polls apart,” she said. “That’s what makes him stand out among anybody. Bach wasn’t a priest, Mozart wasn’t a priest, nor was Beethoven, but Vivaldi was.

In listening to Vivaldi, it’s obvious that he was a very faith-filled man, she said, “you hear it in his music, you listen to it.”

White, who left a thriving greeting card company in England and moved to Venice to pursue an increasing interest in researching Vivaldi’s life, has become an expert and point of reference on the musician.

Not only has she published a book, “Antonio Vivaldi: A Life in Documents,” as the fruit of her research, but she was a consultant for a new display on his life called “Viva Vivaldi: The Four Seasons Mystery.”

The exhibit, located just behind St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice, provides attendees with an indoor video-mapping show done with immersive HD images, surround sound and scent special effects such as scent and wind. It opened to the public May 13 at the Diocesan Museum, and will stay open during 2018.

One of the most famous Baroque composers, Antonio Lucio Vivaldi, affectionately known by many in his time as “the Red Priest” due to his auburn locks, was born in Venice in 1678.

His father, who was an instrumental figure in his life (pun intended), was a professional violinist, and taught his son how to play as a young child. The two then went on tour together throughout Venice, giving Vivaldi an extensive knowledge and even mastery of the violin from a young age.

In 1693, at the age of 15, he began studying for the priesthood. He was ordained in 1703 at the age of 25, and shortly after was appointed chaplain and Violin Master at a local orphanage called the Pio Ospedale della Pieta, or the Devout Hospital of Mercy. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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Tuesday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (080817)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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August 7, 2017

CBS Inadvertently Admits Gun Restrictions on the Law-Abiding Haven’t Worked in Chicago

Filed under: 2nd Amendment,MSM Biz/Other Bias,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 4:28 pm

On Friday’s This Morning show, CBS News reporter Adriana Diaz reported on her seven days on the streets of Chicago’s South Side, one of the most dangerous and crime-ridden areas in the U.S. While her report gamely tried to focus on how guns were to blame for the violence, astute observers who know how difficult it is for law-abiding citizens to get guns in the Windy City will notice that, despite those state- and city-imposed barriers, it’s still very “easy” for criminals to get guns.

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