November 12, 2017

Sunday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (111217)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: It’s official— John Paul I moves forward on path to sainthood

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Vatican City:

Nov 9, 2017 / 02:22 am

The Vatican on Thursday announced that Albino Luciani – better know as Pope John Paul I – has moved forward on the path to sainthood, and can now officially be called “Venerable” by faithful around the world.

Announced in a Nov. 9 communique from the Vatican, the Pope’s decision to green light the cause was made the day before, during a Nov. 8 meeting with Cardinal Angelo Amato, Prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

With Francis’ approval of his heroic virtue, “Papa Luciani,” who until now has held the title “Servant of God,” can be called “Venerable,” which is the step before beatification.

In addition to John Paul I, other causes to move forward are the martyrdom of Giovanni Brenner, a diocesan priest killed in Hungary in 1957, and the martyrdom of Sr. Leonella Sgorbati, killed in hatred of the faith in Somalia in 2006.

Other causes approved of heroic virtue are Bernard of Baden, Fr. Gregorio Fioravanti, Fr. Tommaso Morales Perez of Venezuela, Italian layman Marcellino da Capradosso, and American Sr. Teresa Fardella, foundress of the Poor Sisters, Daughters of Mary of the Most Holy Crown.

Born Oct. 17, 1912, in Italy’s northern Veneto region, Albino Luciani was elected Pope Aug. 26, 1978, and took a double name after his two immediate predecessors, St. John XXIII and Bl. Paul VI.

He sent shock waves around the world when he died unexpectedly just 33 days later, making his one of the shortest pontificates in the history of the Church.

The first Pope to born in the 20th century, he is also the most recent Italian-born Pontiff and is often referred to as “the Smiling Pope” by those who knew him or remember his election.

Despite living in relative poverty, he entered the minor seminary in Feltre in 1923, when he was just 11 years old, and entered the Gregorian Seminary at Belluno five years later, in 1928.

He was ordained a priest July 7, 1935, and after serving in a parish for a few months, in December of that year he was named instructor of religion at the Technical Institute for Miners in Agordo. He became vice-rector of the Belluno seminary just two years later, in 1937 – a position he would hold for the next 10 years. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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November 11, 2017

Fox Biz Host Melissa Francis Scolds Dem Spouting Talking Points; He Promises He Won’t Return

Filed under: Economy,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 11:10 pm

On the Fox Business Network on Tuesday, Happening Now host Melissa Francis would not let her Democratic Party guest get away with refusing to answer her question about tax reform. Eventually, she goaded former Clinton adviser Simon Rosenberg into acknowledging that he was refusing to answer her question (then why did he appear in what he knew would be a discussion segment?); when she wouldn’t move on without getting one, he promised that “I’m never coming back on this show ever again.” Boo hoo.

(more…)

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Not News: Reductions in U.S. CO2 Emissions Dwarf the Rest of the World

The establishment press is making a big deal out of the fact that President Trump has not been and will not be personally invited to a climate summit in Paris in December. Both the media and the folks running the summit, where the utterly unoriginal theme is “Make Our Planet Great Again,” should be thanking the U.S. for its outsized contribution — but to be clear, unnecessary, given that the link between “global warming” and CO2 increases has not been definitively established — to carbon dioxide reduction.

(more…)

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Press on Texas Massacre: Attacker Had ‘Military-Style’ Weapon, Man Who Shot Him Had a ‘Rifle’

The gun-control crowd quickly ratcheted down its political opportunism in the wake of Sunday’s Sutherland Springs, Texas church massacre once it became known that a “good guy with a gun” put a stop to Devin Kelley’s killing spree, saving dozens of lives. At RedState on Wednesday, Carl Arbogast noted that what remained was a double standard in press descriptions of the respective weapons used by Kelley and Stephen Willeford, the man who stopped him.

(more…)

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Saturday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (111117)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: History of Veterans Day

Thanks to all who have served our country in the Armed Forces.

* * * * * *

History of Veterans Day

World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11:00 a.m.

The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words:

Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful relations with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and

Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and

Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.

An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday—a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as “Armistice Day.” Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nation’s history; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first “Veterans Day Proclamation” which stated: “In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans’ organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible.”

… Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the historical significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America’s veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good.

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November 10, 2017

WashPost Scribe Believes Charming Arabella Kushner ‘Forced to Perform’

One of the establishment press’s rules about the Donald Trump era is apparently, “There shall be no puff pieces.” The Washington Post’s Simon Denyer unilaterally decided to extend this rule to Arabella Kushner, the President’s young granddaughter, giving him free rein to tell readers that her wonderful singing for China’s president wasn’t really an unconditionally wonderful event — because, you see, she was “forced to perform.”

(more…)

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Bitter AP Reporter Still Claims Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker ‘Effectively Ended Collective Bargaining’

On Monday, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker announced that he will seek a third term as Badger State Chief Executive next year. At the Associated Press, Scott Bauer, still bitter over Walker’s successful attempt to rein in the power of the state’s public-sector unions in 2011, falsely insisted, as he has for over 6-1/2 years, that Walker’s Act 10 legislation “effectively ended collective bargaining for most public workers.”

(more…)

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Trump Effect: CNBC’s Rick Santelli Does Victory Lap on Post-Election Market Prediction

Wednesday, on the anniversary of Donald Trump’s election, CNBC’s Closing Bell gave the network’s Rick Santelli a bit of an “I told you so” moment. A year ago, contrary to the chorus of naysayers who took it as a given that Trump’s victory would be disastrous for the markets, Santelli correctly predicted strong, sustained market performance.

(more…)

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Friday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (111017)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: 14-Year-Old Meets the Man Who Saved His Life Through Bone Marrow Donation

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Ohio, and Massachusetts:

8:09 AM PST, November 6, 2017

Two families merged over the weekend as a 14-year-old boy finally got to meet the bone marrow donor who saved his life nearly two years ago.

Jack Eppley, of Ohio, was diagnosed with blood cancer when he was just 11 and doctors eventually told the Eppley family that Jack would need a stem cell transplant. It was a life-or-death situation.

Read: After Double Lung Transplant, Opera Singer Performs With Donor’s Daughter

Complete bone marrow matches are rare, and none of Jack’s immediate family turned out to be matches.

Once doctors searched the Be the Match Registry, a national registry dedicated to helping patients receive bone marrow transplants, it emerged that Jack had just two complete matches out of 27 million people.

One of them was Mike Reilly, who lives in Boston. This past weekend, Jack and Reilly were able to meet for the first time.

“We were just so very grateful,” Kacey Huffman, Jack’s mom, told InsideEdition.com. “We knew that there were two matches on the registry but knowing that there are two matches doesn’t mean that everything is going to go smoothly. Those two matches have to agree.”

Mike Reilly had entered himself onto the registry 19 years before at the prompting of his father.

“My father, 19 years ago, said, ‘Hey, get off the couch. We are going to up the street to Grace Lutheran Church in New Hampshire, There’s a kid in town with leukemia — let’s go see if we are a match,’” Reilly said.

After 45 minutes and a couple of vials of blood, Reilly was permanently on the registry.

It wasn’t until 2016, however, that his decision all those years ago would come full circle.

Go here for the rest of the story.

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November 9, 2017

Rand Paul’s Neighbors Push Back Against Reports About ‘Altercation’

Many of Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s neighbors are hotly disputing Louisville Courier Journal and New York Times reports which characterized the Friday assault on the Republican Senator as being the result of “petty arguments over misplaced lawn trimmings and branches” and “a landscaping dispute,” respectively. Among their objections: The  Courier Journal’s Thomas Novelly described the attack, during which Rene Boucher allegedly blindsided Paul and, per the Senator’s most recent tweet, left him with six broken ribs and a “pleural effusion” as a “fight,” while the opening sentence at the Times story authored by three reporters described it as an “altercation.”

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Thursday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (110917)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: Former Abortionist Looked at the “Pile of Body Parts” of an Aborted Baby and Never Did an Abortion Again

Filed under: Life-Based News,Positivity,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Austin, Texas, via LifeNews.com (links are in original):

November 7, 2017

Former abortionist Dr. Anthony Levatino shared his powerful conversion story with a Texas judge Monday during a court hearing about a state dismemberment abortion ban.

Levatino aborted hundreds of unborn babies as an ob-gyn in the 1980s, but he had a change of heart after his young daughter died in a tragic accident. Now, he testifies about the horrors of abortion to audiences, legislators and judges across the country.

The Express reports Levatino described the cruelty of dismemberment abortion before U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel on Monday.

Texas is trying to outlaw the barbaric procedure. But earlier this year, the abortion chains Whole Woman’s Health and Planned Parenthood challenged Texas Senate Bill 8, which prohibits dismemberment abortions, a method typically used in the second trimester to kill nearly fully-formed, living unborn babies. It is a barbaric and dangerous procedure in which the unborn baby is ripped apart in the womb and pulled out in pieces while his or her heart is still beating.

In late August, Yeakel temporarily blocked the state from enforcing the law until the case could go to trial. Yeakel also is presiding over the hearing this week.

Levatino told Yeakel that he performed hundreds of dismemberment abortions in the early 1980s. But one day, after aborting an unborn baby this way, he said he became “sick.” He said he thought of his 6-year-old adopted daughter who had died in a vehicle accident not long before. And when he looked at the “pile of body parts” from the baby who he had just dismembered, Levatino said he realized that he was looking at someone’s child.

“That’s what started a cascade, which over the next few months, ended in not doing any more abortions,” Levatino said.

Levatino described a dismemberment abortion as a “brutal procedure in which a living human being is torn to pieces.”

Go here for the rest of the story.

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